Kim Krisberg

About Kim Krisberg

Kim Krisberg is a freelance public health reporter living in Austin, Texas, and has been writing about public health for more than 15 years. Follow me on Twitter — @kkrisberg — or send me story ideas at kkrisberg@yahoo.com.

Repost: Gun control laws can impact death rates. It’s time to let public health research lead the way.

Guns are the third leading cause of injury-related death in the country. Every year, more than 12,000 gun homicides happen in the U.S., and for every person killed with a gun, two more are injured. Whether Congress will do anything about this violence is a whole other (depressing) article. But there is evidence that change is possible.

By | 2018-02-16T16:40:48+00:00 February 16th, 2018|0 Comments

Occupational Health News Roundup

The Teamsters get ready to become a 'sanctuary union'; a Florida bill would protect immigrant workers injured on the job; low-wage workers return to the streets to fight for $15; and the death of a social worker highlights the risks of occupational violence.

By | 2018-02-13T22:24:13+00:00 February 13th, 2018|0 Comments

For newborns with opioid withdrawal, forgoing intensive care and rooming with mom may be best

One of the more heartbreaking ripple effects of America’s opioid addiction epidemic is a massive increase in newborns experiencing drug withdrawal. Public health officials have tracked a 400 percent increase in such cases — technically known as neonatal abstinence syndrome — with one impacted baby born every 25 minutes as of 2012.

By | 2018-02-12T08:42:13+00:00 February 10th, 2018|0 Comments

New HIV saliva test offers hope for earlier detection, greater prevention

Public health workers have two main tools for HIV screening: a blood test that detects HIV a couple weeks after infection or a saliva test that detects the virus more than a month after infection. With a trick of chemistry, however, scientists at Stanford University have combined the best attributes of both — and the result could mean a serious boost for HIV prevention.

By | 2018-02-05T21:52:41+00:00 February 5th, 2018|0 Comments

Occupational Health News Roundup

It's time for federal lawmakers to catch up with the quickly changing relationship between employers and workers; an upcoming Supreme Court case could upend public-sector unions; New York farmworker loses court case to gain organizing rights, but vows to appeal; and the country's biggest janitorial company faces new allegations of sexual abuse in the workplace.

By | 2018-01-30T19:06:14+00:00 January 30th, 2018|0 Comments

After years of steady progress, America’s uninsured rate begins climbing back up

Despite constant undermining from the Trump administration, nearly 8.8 million Americans got covered during the last open enrollment period on HealthCare.gov. That’s nearly as high as the previous enrollment period, and a testament to people’s desire for health coverage. Still, it seems the administration’s actions didn’t go without impact.

By | 2018-01-19T15:18:09+00:00 January 19th, 2018|0 Comments

Occupational Health News Roundup

Sanitation workers in the meatpacking industry face life-threatening dangers on the job; number of OSHA inspectors down under Trump; truckers feel the pressure to work while sleep-deprived; and despite increased demand for sexual harassment training, there's little evidence it actually works.

By | 2018-01-16T09:26:30+00:00 January 9th, 2018|0 Comments