In wake of Zika outbreak, survey finds major improvements needed in U.S. mosquito control

In southern Texas, the city of Laredo hasn’t confirmed a single case of dengue in nearly 20 years. Just a short walk across the border into Mexico, the city of Nuevo Laredo has confirmed hundreds of cases of the mosquito-borne disease. Hector Gonzalez says the difference lays in the city’s robust commitment to public health-led mosquito control.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:06+00:00 November 7th, 2017|0 Comments

Occupational Health News Roundup

Investigation reveals how Case Farms poultry plants exploit immigrant workers; Chinese workers who make Ivanka Trump's clothing line are overworked and underpaid; California lawmakers consider bill to protect salon workers from harmful chemicals; and Trump's budget would slash funds for combating child and forced labor overseas.

By | 2018-01-22T21:08:44+00:00 May 2nd, 2017|3 Comments

Study: U.S. households that can’t afford water projected to grow by the millions

Can I afford the water that comes out of my tap? It’s not a question that Americans typically ask themselves. However, a new study finds that in the next few years, many more of us might be asking that very question as we open our utility bills and realize that we’re merely accustomed to affordable water — we don’t have a guaranteed right to it.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:15+00:00 January 24th, 2017|3 Comments

New study illustrates risk that climate change poses to safe drinking water, human health

For years, scientists have described climate change as a slowly emerging public health crisis. But for many, it’s difficult to imagine how a complex planetary phenomenon can impact personal well-being beyond the obvious effects of natural disasters, which climatologists say will happen more frequently and intensely as the world warms. That disconnect is what piqued my interest in a new study on old infrastructure, heavy rainfalls and spikes in human illness.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:32+00:00 September 23rd, 2015|2 Comments