Study: Trust in science spiked after media coverage of Zika vaccine trial

Public trust in science is a fickle creature. Surveys show a clear majority of Americans believe science has positively impacted society, and they’re more likely to trust scientists on issues like climate change and vaccines. On the other hand, surveys also find that factors like politics, religion, age and race can greatly impact the degree of that trust. It presents a delicate challenge for agencies that depend on trust in science to do their jobs.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:08+00:00 August 3rd, 2017|0 Comments

Report: U.S. funding for global health research saves lives and creates American jobs

U.S. investments in global health research have saved millions of lives and prevented immeasurable suffering. And by working to detect, treat and eventually eliminate infectious diseases worldwide, we’re protecting our own country too. That cliché about diseases knowing no borders is unfortunately very true. All that alone should be enough to remain committed to the cause.

By | 2018-01-16T09:26:35+00:00 August 2nd, 2017|1 Comment

Zika remains a serious threat. Federal funding cuts will make the problem even worse.

Last year’s emergency Zika funding is about to run out and there’s no new money in the pipeline. It’s emblematic of the kind of short-term, reactive policymaking that public health officials have been warning us about for years. Now, as we head into summer, public health again faces a dangerous, highly complex threat along with an enormous funding gap.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:09+00:00 June 13th, 2017|1 Comment

Trump’s budget is a disaster for public health: ‘If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu’

When you ask public health advocates about President Trump’s recent budget proposal, you typically get a bewildered pause. Public health people don’t like to exaggerate — they follow the science, they stay calm, they face off against dangerous threats on a regular basis. Exaggerating doesn’t help contain diseases, it only makes it harder. So it’s concerning when you hear words like this about Trump’s budget: “devastating,” “not serious,” “ludicrous,” “unfathomable.”

By | 2018-01-14T15:37:45+00:00 June 6th, 2017|1 Comment

The PRIDE Study is open for enrollment: People are ‘hungry to be heard and represented’

Last week, researchers officially opened enrollment in the nation’s first decades-long study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer health — an effort they hope will transform our understanding of the health challenges LGBTQ people face and begin narrowing a giant data gap on their physical, mental and social well-being.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:10+00:00 May 23rd, 2017|4 Comments

Study: U.S. Zika burden could cost billions in medical care, lost productivity

A Zika attack rate of just 1 percent across the six states most at risk for the mosquito-borne disease could result in $1.2 billion in medical costs and lost productivity, a new study finds. That’s more than the $1.1 billion in emergency Zika funding that Congress approved last year after months of delay and which is expected to run out this summer.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:10+00:00 May 18th, 2017|1 Comment

Study: Seven-fold increase in antibiotic-resistant infection among children

Most news on the dangers of antibiotic-resistant infections focus on adults. But children are very much at risk too. In fact, a recent study found that U.S. children have experienced a 700 percent surge in infections caused by particular bacteria that’s both resistant to multiple antibiotics and responsible for growing numbers of serious bacterial infections in kids.

By | 2018-01-14T16:39:14+00:00 March 3rd, 2017|0 Comments